An introduction to the issue of hate groups

Gemma Volume 20, Number 3 Spring Issue theme:

An introduction to the issue of hate groups

In the Midwest, economics is a more influential factor than immigration. On the East Coast, more religious areas correlate with more per capita hate groups, while education has little influence. Richard Medina, University of Utah assistant professor of geography and lead author of the research, said public perceptions of hate and its motivating factors are often oversimplified.

Emily Nicolosi, University of Utah graduate student and co-author of the paper, said that what happened in Charlottesville started national conversations she believes the research can support. Researchers mapped population percentage of White non-Latinos because places changing from strong racial and ethnic similarity are more likely to experience a negative reaction to change.

Hate group - Wikipedia

Poverty is a driver of hate because extremist groups promise the impoverished a way out of financial difficulty or provide a group to blame. The group also measured conservative religious and political ideology. The maps of these socioeconomic factors were then compared to a map of organized hate groups across the country that the Southern Poverty Law Center created.

The hate groups were mapped down to the county level in each state. The states with the most hate groups per million people in population were Montana, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Vermont. Comparing the socioeconomic map with the hate group map showed which factors were the strongest indicators in different regions of the country.

In general, the research reveals that less diversity, more poverty, less population change, and less education all correlate with more hate groups.

But how influential those factors are depends on where you live. On the West Coast, high poverty and a large concentration of White people in an area are the most influential factors driving hate groups. While the region generally has racial diversity, non-White people moving in and changing a demographic quickly can become targets, Medina said.

In the southern parts of California and Arizona, lower education levels and higher poverty levels are the most important indicators.

In the central United States, economic factors—such as poverty and employment levels—are most likely to push people into hate groups. Immigration is less of a factor because fewer people are moving into the region compared to the coasts.

Population shift is the most telling factor on the East Coast. Areas with more people leaving than coming have more hate groups. This trend is also present throughout the country, Medina said, but is most prominent in the East.

Rates of education, poverty, and diversity have less influence there. The measurements of ideology—by concentrations of religious people and Republicans—created somewhat different regional maps.

Counties with strong religious communities have fewer hate groups on the West Coast and parts of the Midwest and Southeast. Yet, most of the Midwest and East Coast see more hate groups as counties grow more religious.

Similar geographic trends are seen when tracking hate groups and Republicanism.Online Hate - An Introduction The Internet has been rightly hailed as a groundbreaking interactive marketplace of ideas where anyone with the right hardware and software can set up a cyber-stall.

In this introduction to the special symposium on the philosophy of hate crime, it involves the complicated issue of relations between groups as they are issue of what sort of attitude the “hate” aspect of these crimes is supposed to be and, in effect, what is morally important about it. Second, hate crime laws only punish criminal acts that target victims because of the victim’s race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. Preaching is not a criminal act. Third, the federal statute explicitly protects this activity. Are hate crimes really a problem in America today? Hate crimes are disturbingly prevalent. Hate Groups: May 8, • Volume 19, Issue Is extremism on the rise in the United States? By Peter Katel. an annual tally by the Southern Poverty Law Center shows hate groups operating in , a 50 percent increase over the number in Hate Groups: Race and Hate Crimes: Feedback | Suggest a Topic |.

An Introduction to Hate Crime Laws. Don’t hate crimes punish thoughts? Or speech?

An introduction to the issue of hate groups

Hate crime legislation has never been about punishing people for their beliefs or speech. Rather, it is about punishing people for their criminal actions. The Supreme Court unanimously upheld Wisconsin’s.

Introduction to Domestic Extremism and Hate Groups. Tab Group. The course will provide a definition of violent extremism and focus on individuals and groups that attempt to advance social or political beliefs through force or violence and in violation of state or federal law. Domestic extremist movements covered will include white.

Ad Policy. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s (SPLC) annual census of “extremist” groups, “The number of hate groups in the United States rose for a second year in a row in.

Second, hate crime laws only punish criminal acts that target victims because of the victim’s race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc.

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Preaching is not a criminal act. Third, the federal statute explicitly protects this activity.

Donald Trump’s Rise Has Coincided With an Explosion of Hate Groups | The Nation

Are hate crimes really a problem in America today? Hate crimes are disturbingly prevalent. Investigating hate crimes is the highest priority of the FBI’s Civil Rights program.

Hate Groups: CQR